27 July 2017

2016 Keren Hishtalmut Data

The Ministry of Finance (MOF) sponsors a site called GemelNet, which includes data regarding all of the keren hishtalmut options available.

Important Note

I am not a pension advisor, insurance agent, or financial consultant.  As a lay person, I enjoy seeing how the various funds perform and use the information personally.  Below is a look at some of the data from that site that I compiled for my own personal use.

Why Is This Data Important to Me?

When I was first offered keren hishtalmut (קרן השתלמות / literally “continuing education fund” but used today as a general savings plan), I asked my co-workers how I should choose.  They told me that they just pick whatever the insurance agent recommended as they’re all pretty much the same.  With time, I learned that not all funds are created equal – and GemelNet helped prove that.  There, the MOF aggregates data about all of the funds available.

About the 2016 Keren Hishtalmut Data

Included in the table are the 139 keren hishtalmut options that are currently active, and have been in existence and have data for the last 5 years or longer.  Below are a list of some of the data included, as well as how they are highlighted in the chart.

  1. Average earnings over the last 5 years and 3 years
    1. Above average or below average indicated by colors: For the columns displaying the returns over the last 5 years and the last 3 years, those with returns that were above the average as indicated by the MOF were colored green for that period, with colors descending through yellow all the way to red, which indicates those with average returns that are the lowest.
    2. Despite the data, one must keep in mind that past performance is no guarantee of future results.
  2. Sharpe ratio
    1. What is Sharpe? Of course, returns aren’t everything.  Sharpe is a measure of returns relative to the risk taken on.  Given two funds which earn the same amount (say 5%), the one which did so more smoothly and with less volatility would have a higher Sharpe ratio.  (For more information, see these Wall Street Journal and Morningstar articles).
    2. Above average or below average indicated by colors: Those with Sharpe ratios in the highest percentile are green, with colors descending through yellow all the way to red, which indicates those with Sharpe ratio in the lowest percentile.
  3. Fees on the balance
    1. Above average or below average indicated by colors: Those with fees above the average as indicated by the MOF are green, with colors descending through yellow all the way to red, which indicates those with fees that are the highest.
    2. The fees listed are those paid by the average client; fees can be negotiable.

The 2016 Keren Hishtalmut Data

Next Steps

I used this table as a jumping off point to look at the funds which most interested me.  GemelNet allows you to drill down into each fund to see more about how and where funds are invested.  Go to the GemelNet website in order to click through and learn more about each fund.

Reminder: What This Post Is and What It Is Not

Please note that none of this information on this or any other part of No Fryers – including both the keren hishtalmut listed and the highlights – constitutes either advice or recommendations for any individual.  It is general information only, which can never take into account your individual situation.  Before making financial decisions, you should seek other sources of information, such as the advice of a trusted financial advisor who is working on your behalf.

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